Ask The Nuwaupians, Why does Malachi York teach that Dingir means "the righteous ones of the rocket ships"?

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Ask The Nuwaupians, Why does Malachi York teach that Dingir means the righteous ones of the rocket ships?

Answer: The will say "pops" gave us all the facts about this and no one has ever proven it wrong.

This post will prove both York and Sitchin wrong based on the evidence.  York made this bold comment in the opening of his bible,

"I call you to accept this truth as bestowed upon me by the masters who guide my pen, for of myself I could not have done the works of it."

-Malachi York: Holy Tablets - A Personal Note From the Receiver

 

After reading the information below, you'll more than likely come to the conclusion that Sitchin was one of the masters who guided York's pen.  Nuwaupians are clueless on the topic of Sumerian literature, architecture, language and culture. York in his Holy Tablets, the glossary section, he makes the following statements about the Dingir sign .


Dinneer/Dingir - Din-neer/ Din-geer, Sumerian, "The Righteous Ones Of The Rocket Ships"

-Holy Tablets pg. 1664

 

It's important to note that a Dingir is a determinative; and determinatives helps the reader decide which possible value of a polyvalent sign was intended by the writer.  A determinative is one of a limited number of signs which, when placed before or after a sign or group of signs, indicates that the determined object belongs to a particular semantic category, e.g. wooden, reed, copper or bronze objects, or persons, deities, places, etc. Determinatives were still basically optional as late as the Ur III period.

When Eme.gir (Sumerian) died as a spoken language, they became obligatory. Determinatives were presumably not to be pronounced when a text was read, and to show that they are not actually part of a word linguist transliterate in unilingual Sumerian context at least as superscripts. 

Example, the plow sign, the polyvalent sign APIN is read apin - if preceded by a wood determinative it becomes GIŠAPIN "plow" 

What we're addressing is the determinative Dingir which precedes a deities name, for example,

 

The lowercase letter "d" represents the sign Dingir.  Having a little background information on Sumerian determinatives helps to debunk York's teachings as well as Zecharia Sitchin's.

 York who claimed to have "76 trillion years of knowledge", an avatar for the mythical Melchizedek and "being guided by the Masters" took the easy way out by using the teaching of Zecharia Sitchin. The definition of "The Righteous Ones Of The Rocket Ships" was taken straight off the pages of Sitchin's books.

"The shaft of the rocket is clearly stored underground, in a man-made silo constructed of tubular segments and decorated with leopard skins...We can see that the rocket contained a number of compartments. The lower one shows two men surrounded by curving tubes. Above them there are three circular panels. Comparing the size of the rockethead - the ben-ben - to the size of the two men inside the rocket, and the people above the ground, it is evident that the rockethead - equivalent to the Sumerian mu, the "celestial chamber" - could easily hold one or two operators or passengers."

-The 12TH Planet: The Nephilim - People of the Fiery Rockets by Zecharia Sitchin

 

The term "Mu" that Sitchin mentions is in emegir (Sumerian), and does NOT  mean or depicts a rocket, it's simply is a term for a year and the Sumerian word for fire or flame is ganzer, in Akkadian it's, "nablu", flash of fire, flame.

569. na4maš-da na4dub-ba-an ga-an-ze-er bar7-a

570. na4u2-ru-tum na-me nu-gub-bu

571. na4ga-sur-ra zi murgu2-še3 šub-bu ḫe2-em-ta-ab-KA×NE-a

572. ki-bal-a sur3-gin7 ma-mu2-un-ze2-en

573. kur sa-ba mu-e-ši-gub-bu-un-za-na-gin7

 

569-573 "Mašda stone, dubban stone, blazing fires; urutum stone, which nothing resists; when the gasura stone …… and you were set ablaze, you burnt against me in the rebel lands like a brazier. Since you all stood against me in the land of Saba: mašda stone, they shall slaughter you like a sheep. Dubban stone, they shall crunch you for pulverising. Urutum stone, they shall sharpen you for the battle-mace; with bronze, the arrowheads of the gods, they shall smash you with the axe, stinging with fierce swords."

-Ninurta's exploits: a šir-sud to Ninurta- taken from The Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature

 

To demonstrate how York came up with the definition of fiery rockets, I have to give a brief background on Sitchin's concept of fiery rockets because York plagiarizes Sitchin's work on this issue.  Sitchin presents in his books a sourceless image that he claims is an ancient "fiery rocket" he called a mu. He goes on to write that,

"The shaft of the rocket is clearly stored underground, in a man-made silo constructed of tubular segments and decorated with leopard skins..."

-The 12TH Planet: The Nephilim - People of the Fiery Rockets

When this image is rotated, we see the following,

Sitchin theorizes this image to mean a "fiery rocket",

"Very much in the manner of modern draftsmen, the ancient artists showed a cross-section of the underground silo. We can see that the rocket contained a number of compartments. The lower one shows two men surrounded by curving tubes. Above them there are three circular panels. Comparing the size of the rockethead - the ben-ben - to the size of the two men inside the rocket, and the people above the ground, it is evident that the rockethead - equivalent to the Sumerian mu, the 'celestial chamber' - could easily hold one or two operators or passengers....A review of the Sumerian pictographs and ideograms leaves no doubt that whoever drew those signs was familiar with the shapes and purposes of rockets with tails of billowing fire, missile-like vehicles, and celestial cabins."

"Finally, let us look at the pictographic sign for 'gods' in Sumerian. The term was a two-syllable word: DIN.GIR.  We have already seen what the symbol for GIR was: a two-stage rocket with fins. DIN, the first syllable, meant 'righteous, pure, bright.'

 

Put together, then, DIN.GIR as gods or divine beings conveyed the meaning 'the righteous ones of the bright, pointed objects' or, more explicitly, the pure ones of the blazing rockets."

The pictographic sign can easily bring to mind a powerful jet engine spewing flames from the end part, and a front part that is puzzlingly open. But the puzzle turns to amazement if we spell dingir by combining the two pictographs.

 

The tail of the finlike gir fits perfectly into the opening in the front of din.. The astounding result is a picture of a rocket-propelled spaceship, with a landing craft docked into it perfectly - just as the lunar module was docked with the Apollo 11 spaceship!

-The 12TH Planet: The Nephilim - People of the Fiery Rockets

 

York relied heavily on Sitchin's pseudo scholarship, so much so that he passed it on to the Nuwaupians in a book where he says that his pen was "guided by the Masters" it appears that Zecharia Sitchin was one of the MASTERS who guided Malachi York's pen.

Keep in mind that York using Sitchin's definitions and terms also uses Din-neer - Sumerian, The Righteous Ones Of The Rocket Ships, there is no such word Dinneer in Sumerian defined as the Righteous Ones Of The Rocket Ships.  The closest determinative with that spelling is Dimmeer, this is found in emesal, the Sumerian feminine form of emegir (Sumerian) language..  Here's an example.

1. a-ju10 an ma-an-ze2-ej3 ki ma-an-ze2-ej3

2. me-e dga-ca-an-an-na-jen

3. ma?-ra dim3-me-er tec2 mu-da-sa2-a

4. dmu-ul-lil2-le an ma-an-ze2-ej3 ki <ma-an-ze2-ej3>

 

1-3 My father gave me the heavens and he gave me the earth. I am Inana! Which god compares with me? Enlil gave me the heavens and he gave me the earth. I am Inana!

-A balbale (?) to Inana (Inana Fem.)  Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature

 

Clearly York was unaware of the linguistic facts around this determinative (indicator) Din.gir, to take Sitchin's definitions and concepts without a serious investigation shows he could careless about his readers, as long as he got those books to the people for a price.

 

Needless to say, there is no Sumerian term for  "rocket".